​Established in 1992, the Commanding General's Mounted Color Guard provides a link to Fort Riley's historic past. Troopers and horses of this unit are outfitted in the uniforms, accoutrements and equipment of the Civil War period. Soldiers are detailed from the ranks of units assigned to Fort Riley and receive instruction from manuals used by Civil War cavalrymen.

From privates to officers, these men and women recreate the colorful spectacle of the American Horse Soldier. They demonstrate their horsemanship for professional rodeos, community events, parades, school groups and official ceremonies.

The CGMCG performs mounted drill and weapons demonstrations and parades for community events and rodeos, as well as military ceremonies on Fort Riley.

 The mounted demonstration is an exhibition of skill and precision required of a cavalry horse soldier. It includes various drills using the 1861 Cavalry Light Saber, .45-caliber revolver and the 1873 Remington .45-caliber lever action repeater rifle. The demonstrations require an area 150 feet by 200 feet.

The Commanding General's Mounted Color Guard represents Fort Riley and the U.S. Army in a highly professional and polished display of cavalry horsemanship and military tradition. They portray the U.S. Cavalry as they appeared in mid to late 19th century.

Soldiers in the CGMCG are assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 1st Infantry Division.

Ft. Riley Cavalry Commanding General's Mounted Colorguard


Exhibition and Reenactment at the Guthrie Flats